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first_imgThe Not-So-Royal Shakespeare Company’s (NSR) performance of “Pericles, Prince of Tyre” opens Thursday night at 7 p.m. in the Washington Hall Lab Theatre.Senior Liz Konicek, the club’s president, said the production has been a group effort from the beginning.“This semester we took applications and then collaboratively decided as a group, with our new freshmen, as well, what play we wanted to do,” she said. “We got a lot of response from ‘Pericles’ which was, I think, surprising to all of us because it’s not a well-known play.”The group hopes because the play is less famous than some other Shakespeare works, more people will to come to the show and learn more about it, Konicek said. “We just hope that people will be interested because, quite frankly, I think most of us hadn’t heard of ‘Pericles,’” she said. “I think that’s going to be the more pervasive view on campus … which we’re hoping means people are going to want to try something new.”Junior Cassidy Leyendecker, co-vice president of NSR, said the club prides itself on making Shakespeare accessible for actors and audiences.“When you’re getting people involved, having Shakespeare is awesome because there are so many people who love Shakespeare, but then you also have a lot of people who are afraid of Shakespeare,” Leyendecker said. “We want to get people involved. It seems super daunting at first, but once you get into it, our club does a really good job of trying to ease people into it and understanding.”Konicek also said in order to make the performances fun and entertaining, the club builds off of the foundation Shakespeare himself laid when writing his plays.“Shakespeare seems daunting and it seems pretentious, maybe, but Shakespeare himself, he made crass jokes all the time,” she said. “He was not a pretentious guy. … If you see a boring production of one of Shakespeare’s comedies, they’re doing it wrong.”One of the club’s biggest advantages, Leyendecker said, is the huge amount of collaboration and effort that goes into the productions.“NSR has a group of people that so much care about the club. The people right now want the club to succeed so much, which is really cool,” she said. “It’s kind of a different environment to be in than if you’re doing another show where it’s just the director and the stage manager being involved. This, you have all the officers in it, and everyone is creating events every week to get [the] cast together.”The club has come together to put on an enjoyable show, Konicek said, and has experimented with different ideas to make it unique.“We try and push the envelope and try new things, and a lot of it comes down to the fact that we pride ourselves … on being collaborative and being a team of students,” she said. “This is really a chance for us all to show our talents creatively and to work together and really forge a tight-knit bond. … It’s Shakespeare as performance, yes, but also Shakespeare as coming together.”The club’s size this year has made it easier for NSR to push boundaries with the more creative aspects of the show, Leyendecker said. “Our cast is huge,” she said. “We have 18 people, which is big for fitting in the Washington Hall black box, so what we’re trying to do is focus so much on the cast. … We’re trying to really make it a story. … We just kind of want this drama and this excitement that hopefully get more people involved and excited about coming to see it.”She also said the group has enjoyed playing with some of the more outlandish aspects of the play itself.“Basically, this show is Shakespeare’s ‘Game of Thrones,’” she said. “There are just the craziest things [in it]… and we’ve had a blast doing it for the past month and a half. I’m more excited about the process of it than even performing it.”Konicek said the combination of Shakespeare’s writing and the company’s creative collaboration has allowed then to craft an exciting and entertaining production.“You shouldn’t be afraid of Shakespeare, and if you are, then I think the people who’ve been teaching you about it or performing it for you might not be doing it right,” she said. “It may be weird, it may be odd, and unusual and strange as a play, but it’s not boring.”Tags: Not-So-Royal Shakespeare, Shakespeare at Notre Dame, Washington Halllast_img read more

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first_imgLegislature works on Art. V funding glitch bills Legislature works on Art. V funding glitch bills Gary Blankenship Senior Editor If you want an idea about how complex it is as the state works to take over more funding from the counties for the trial court system, consider SB 2962.In legislative lingo, it’s known as a “glitch” bill. Lawmakers knew they would be working on such a measure last year when they approved HB 113A, more than 100 pages of details of how the legislature would accomplish the mandate of the 1998 constitutional amendment to pay a bigger share of trial court funding.The legislature must do that by July 1.Ever since the bill passed last spring, legislators have been working with court officials, court clerks, and local governments to make necessary improvements.On March 22, the Senate Judiciary took up SB 2962 to address those needed changes to last year’s legislation.The committee promptly amended the bill about 40 times, to accommodate more changes, and speakers and senators said they anticipate additional alterations.When it came before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Article V Funding and Judiciary on March 29, the bill was amended another score or so times.And senators said several more changes are expected before the bill clears the Senate.The House took a different approach. Its glitch bill was passed by its Select Committee on Article V on March 31 after Chair Rep. Holly Benson, R-Pensacola, and committee members negotiated with the affected groups. It passed with only one amendment and general praise from various interested groups.The House bill is now heading for the appropriations subcommittee that deals with the court system, while the Senate bill is heading for the full Appropriations Committee.Both bills address several concerns, including funding for local legal aid programs and law libraries, but the House and Senate took different approaches.SB 2962 amended F.S. §939.18 which allows a court to add an additional $150 onto costs to those convicted of a felony, misdemeanor, or criminal traffic charge, with the money going to court facilities, including legal aid programs and law libraries.The House bill, which had not been given a bill number at Bar News press time, amended the same provision.But it dropped the amount of the assessed cost to $50 and provided the cost could be levied by counties instead of the court. The bill specified that 40 percent of the monies raised would go to a court innovation fund, 25 percent to legal aid programs, 25 percent to law libraries, and 10 percent to teen court programs. (SB 2962 has a separate provision that allows a $3 cost to be added to some cases to pay for teen courts.)Both bills allow counties and cities to contract with state attorneys and public defenders to handle the prosecution and defense of local ordinances—which had been banned in HB 113A. SB 2962 merely allows the cities and counties to enter into those contracts. The House bill specified the reimbursement rate at $60 an hour.Representatives of the Florida League of Cities and the Florida Association of Counties told the House committee $60 was too high and might lead local government to shun enforcing their laws.Filing fees for local ordinance enforcement cases were dropped from $200 to $50 in SB 2962 to ease the financial burden on local governments. The House bill set the filing at $10, but then also took a 30-percent split of any fines and costs imposed, not to be less than $40 per case.Both bills further refine the duties of local committees that will set standards and reimbursement rates for court-appointed attorneys and for a statewide committee that will set standards for computer and other technology related equipment, with an eye to create an integrated court technology system.“There are outstanding questions that remain,” said Sen. Rod Smith, D-Gainesville, sponsor of the bill and chair of the appropriations subcommittee.“We’re getting closer to getting it right. It is literally a rewrite of a huge amount of Florida law. We want to get it right.”“It’s been an awesome job,” added Sen. Alex Villalobos, chair of the Judiciary Committee and who, along with Smith, have been leaders in the Senate on the Article V funding issues.Benson said she will continue to work with court, county, clerk, and other officials to resolve remaining concerns.“I truly feel we have one of the best court systems in the country and after we pass this we will [continue] to have one of the best court systems in the country, and we couldn’t have done it without your help,” she told the audience at the select committee meeting.Of particular interest to The Florida Bar, both House and Senate bills have a $100 fee on out-of-state lawyers admitted pro hac vice in Florida. In new rules proposed to regulate multijurisdictional practices, the Bar proposes a $250 fee for pro hac vice admittees, and is concerned about potential conflicts between state and Bar fees. The Bar also is worried about problems in collecting the fees.At the March 29 meeting, Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, had an amendment to drop the state $100 fee, but withdrew it. He said, however, that he is working with the Bar on the matter and anticipated that any problems would be worked out.Campbell said his concern was that “we have pro hac vice in the state of Florida where a lot of lawyers from out of state who are not admitted in Florida come here and practice law, frequently for a long period of time and we never charge them.”State money raised from the fee, he said, could fund guardian ad litem, legal aid, and law library programs.The matter was not discussed at the House committee meeting.Also of note at the Senate subcommittee meeting, the panel approved an amendment adding $3 per page to documents that are recorded by court clerks. Fred Baggett, general counsel for the Florida Association of Court Clerks, said clerks now charge $6 for the first page and $4.50 for each subsequent page, and that the average recorded document is three pages. That means the costs for the average recording will go from $15 to $24, the first such raise in those fees since 1980.The money from the new charge will be split between the clerks and the state and go for technology improvements. Smith noted there has been a dispute between the counties and the state about who should pay for computer technology, including whether the state or counties are responsible for providing computer services.The new fee will give both clerks and the state money to pay for those needs, he said, noting it will raise $78 million overall, with the state’s share coming in at $25 to $27 million.The House bill does not have that language, although the change to F.S. §939.18 does set up the court innovation fund.Both the Senate panels and the House committee unanimously approved their bills.Although court and other officials generally expressed satisfaction with the bills, they noted many details still need to be worked out.Kent Spuhler, executive director of Florida Legal Services, Inc., told the Senate Article V subcommittee of his concern that counties might not appropriate enough to replace the $8 million local legal programs get from filing fee surcharges that will be taken over by the state on July 1. Sen. Smith noted the Senate bill was amended to require counties to continue the same appropriation as was in effect on September 30, 2003.At the House committee, Spuhler said his calculations showed the $50 surcharge, of which 25 percent would go for legal aid programs, raised only $2 million statewide, resulting in a $6 million cut for already strapped legal aid programs.Benson said staff projections showed the figure was at least $7.5 million and said they would work with Spuhler and others to ensure funding was adequate. Rep. Dan Gelber, D-Miami Beach, said House members are committed to providing the money, adding, “At no time has this committee or this chair ever not had a commitment to making sure there is a revenue stream for your agencies.”Sixth Circuit Judge Susan Schaeffer, chair of the Supreme Court’s Trial Court Budget Commission, told the House committee its bill met nearly all of the courts’ concerns and needs, adding, “We think the bill is great.”Among the minor concerns, she said, is the courts’ desire for an additional $1.50 fee to be split among clerks and the courts for educating employees. Additionally, the innovation fund money from the revised $50 cost should not go directly to the state, but should go to local funds controlled by circuit chief judges who would then account to the state on how the money was used for court enhancements.Representatives from the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers said they were concerned that state attorneys will be given representation under the bills on the local committees that oversee indigent criminal defense issues, including hiring conflict attorneys and the reimbursement rates for expert witnesses and other costs. They said that would be a conflict for the prosecutors to have a say in such defense issues.Among the provisions of the bills are:• Raising filing fees for the district courts of appeal and the Supreme Court from $250 to $400. (The DCA filing fee will be $50 to file a notice of appeal at the circuit court and then $350 at the DCA.)• Creation of a Judicial Information Integration Competency Center, which, in the Senate legislation, will include a steering committee, a data requirements work group, and a data network integration work group. The center is charged with advising the legislature on the creation of an integrated computer system to serve the state court system. The courts, clerks, public defenders, prosecutors, and counties would all have representation in the center’s activities.A Senate amendment to give judges more discretion on appointing counsel was withdrawn, but Smith, Campbell, and Villalobos said they still have concerns about how those lawyers will be chosen. Villalobos said he would like to see minimum standards set for those attorneys, and he was also concerned that large firms might take advantage by having all their lawyers sign up on the appointment rotation list, even ones not qualified to handle cases.John Ricco, representing the Florida Association of Counties, told both the House and Senate panels that their glitch bills are an improvement on legislation passed last year, but many areas remain to be worked out.Communications services, which remain the counties’ responsibility to fund, must be defined, he said, which includes deciding who pays for subpoena and courier services, phone systems, and related equipment and services. He also noted that the counties have lost more than $400 million in annual revenues through the state’s taking over court fine and forfeiture receipts and withholding revenue sharing money as it seeks funds to pay for Article V costs. April 15, 2004 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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first_imgOn an Election Day in the midst of a devastating pandemic and a clash of competing visions of America, fear was the great uniter, and motivator.- Advertisement –last_img

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first_imgXiaomi Mi 11 was reportedly recently spotted on Geekbench with a Snapdragon 875 SoC and has now been tipped to feature a 48-megapixel ultra-wide camera. The Geekbench listing comes with model number M2012K11C and hints at some of the specifications that can be expected from the rumoured phone. The details about the camera were shared by a known tipster on Chinese microblogging website Weibo, however, the post does not mention a name for the phone, and it could have been a different device from the company.The Geekbench listing from last week for a Xiaomi phone with model number M2012K11C, believed to be the Mi 11, hints at the presence of the yet to be announced Snapdragon 875 SoC. While the listing itself does not mention the name of the processor, a report by DealandTech mentions that the source code for the listing states the ‘Adreno 660′ GPU, which is rumoured to be present in the Snapdragon 875 SoC. The listing also shows 6GB of RAM and Android 11, along with a single core-score of 1,105 and a multi-core score of 3,512.- Advertisement – Coming to the post by known tipster Digital Chat Station on Weibo, it states that the first of two smartphones that will come with the Snapdragon 875 SoC will feature a 48-megapixel ultra-wide-angle camera sensor with a 0.8μm pixel size. The tipster adds that there will be a big upgrade in image stabilisation as well. While the post does not reveal a name, the phone in question is believed to be the Mi 11 or the Mi 11 Pro.Xiaomi has not shared details about the Mi 11 series yet, but since the Mi 10 series was among the first to bring the Snapdragon 865 SoC to market, the same can be expected with the Mi 11 series and the Snapdragon 875 SoC. Qualcomm is expected to announce the Snapdragon 875 on December 1.Which is the best TV under Rs. 25,000? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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first_imgUK-based Independent Oil and Gas (IOG) has completed the first run on the Thames Pipeline intelligent pigging program with one more to come in the following weeks.IOG said on Tuesday that the intelligent pigging program (IPP) was being conducted in cooperation with Subsea 7 as a diving support vessel provider, Rosen as a pig supplier, operational management from ODE, and engineering support from EnerMech.The company added that three 12-meter sections of the Thames pipeline were cut 60 kilometers offshore on May 3, just beyond the point where the Southwark gas field will tie into the recommissioned 24-inch Thames export pipeline.“These were transported onshore and visual inspection showed them to be in extremely good condition, with very little evidence of corrosion or wall thickness degradation. This was a significant first step in verifying the integrity of this gas pipeline, which was decommissioned in 2015,” the company said.A temporary subsea pig receiver was then installed at this 60km tie-in point and a successful pipeline pressure test was undertaken from the Bacton gas terminal to this receiver.Next, a cleaning and roundness gauging pigging run was successfully conducted from Bacton to the offshore tie-in point, where an offshore pig launcher was then installed. This enabled the 60km intelligent pigging run from offshore to Bacton to be completed on May 26.Intelligent pigs are devices run through pipelines to assess pipeline wall thickness and to evaluate any evidence of corrosion. Offshore surveys Second run  Over January to May 2018, the Fugro MV Galaxy vessel completed the various offshore surveys needed to support the development of the Blythe and Vulcan Satellites Hubs. The work program comprised geophysical surveys, shallow seismic of the four platform and five drill sites, general inspection surveys of the Thames pipeline, environmental surveys, and geotechnical surveys.Post survey work will entail data processing, analysis, interpretation and reporting, geotechnical laboratory testing and analysis of cores, environmental laboratory testing and analysis of samples and the integration of geophysical, geotechnical and environmental data and final reporting. All of this acquired data is required for field development plan approvals.Andrew Hockey, CEO of IOG, said: “The Intelligent Pigging Programme has so far provided extensive and valuable new information to the IOG team to support our plans to recommission the fully-owned Thames Pipeline and produce our Proven and Probable reserves of over 300 BCF safely into the Bacton gas terminal and the UK market.”He also added: “While this gives us even greater assurance on the pipeline’s fitness for purpose, we do still require the intelligent pigging data acquisition to be fully and properly completed. We are now fast-tracking plans to have this done as soon as possible, while our other project development workstreams continue in parallel to maintain our good momentum towards FDP approvals for this substantial UK gas project.“The successful completion of our four-month offshore survey program, which has provided a wealth of required data, is also a key step in that regard.” “While the steps mentioned above give IOG’s management very strong confidence in the pipeline’s condition, in order to recommission this pipeline the company nonetheless firmly requires a complete data set from an intelligent pigging inspection, so that all stakeholders including contractors and funders are fully satisfied as to its reuse. IOG is, therefore, planning a second intelligent pigging run to complete data acquisition at the earliest opportunity, which is expected to be within weeks,” IOG added.Following the intelligent pig run, the pipeline was successfully hydrotested with inhibited sea water for 24 hours to confirm integrity and has now been suspended in a safe condition.Hydrotesting involves elevating the water pressure in the pipeline for a sustained period and is another key step in pipeline validation. According to the company, the success of this test provides evidence that the pipeline is fit for purpose for IOG’s needs.IOG also said that the need for a second intelligent pig run would inevitably have some impact on the project schedule. The company advised the Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) of this requirement and will request a short extension on the FDP approval target date, which is currently the end of August 2018.Subject to final pigging results, the pipeline will be ready for recommissioning to export IOG’s Southern North Sea gas portfolio, which contains 303 BCF of 2P gas reserves across five proven fields, plus further development and appraisal assets.last_img read more

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first_imgDaily Mail 30 June 2019Family First Comment: “In recent years there has been a series of shocking killings committed by cannabis users who had developed psychosis due to their use of the drug. They often become delusional and hear voices.”Sign our petition today CannabisInquiry.nzCannabis-induced psychosis has reached crisis levels, forcing the NHS to open the first clinic specifically treating addicts of the mind-altering drug, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.The clinic has been launched by a leading psychiatrist who warns that psychosis among users of skunk – a very strong strain of cannabis flooding the streets – has become ‘a crisis that we can simply no longer ignore’, with tens of thousands of people affected.In recent years there has been a series of shocking killings committed by cannabis users who had developed psychosis due to their use of the drug. They often become delusional and hear voices.The clinic launch comes amid mounting calls for the legalisation of cannabis for recreational use, with Tory MP Crispin Blunt among the pro-campaigners.Drug users who have experienced psychosis for the first time after using skunk will undergo a three-month programme, including specialist psychological help aimed at weaning them off the drug.Among the current patients is a former trainee teacher who is now too addled to even read a book.Dr Marta Di Forti, one of the principal doctors at the clinic, based at the South London and Maudsley NHS foundation trust, told The Mail on Sunday: ‘This is a crisis of high potency cannabis that we can simply no longer ignore.‘This clinic is now responding to that crisis.READ MORE: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7196735/NHS-forced-open-Britains-clinic-cannabis-psychosis.htmllast_img read more

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first_imgINDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch will be in Indianapolis today.It’s part of a nationwide Community Policing Tour to strengthen relations between law enforcement and citizens.Lynch will meet with police officers, prosecutors and community advocates at the Indianapolis Metro Police Department Training Academy and the east district police station.Lynch was chosen by President Barack Obama and confirmed last April to serve as the nation’s top prosecutor.Lynch visited Cincinnati in the first phase of the Community Policing Tour last summer.last_img read more

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first_imgNorth Decatur JV won in 2 sets. 25-22, 25-21.Jenna Geis had 2 blocks and 5 kills. Abby Hartman had 2 blocks and 5 kills. Anna Burkhart added 4 aces and 17 digs. Kalyn Muckerheide had 10 digs and 8 assists.North Decatur Varsity won in 4 sets. 25-14, 25-15, 26-28, 25-14.Kara Muckerheide had 22 digs, 4 kills and 23 assists. Erica Gauck 12 digs and 11 kills. Abby  Morrow had 7 kills and 4 blocks. Olivia Bohman 10 kills. Maddy Day 14 kills and 6 aces.Courtesy of Chargers Coach Ashley Gauck.last_img read more

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first_img “As far as what happened on Tuesday, the main thing is when I get home I can go home and I can go to sleep knowing that I’ve not done anything wrong, because I never meant to do that and it was not on purpose,” he told the Daily Telegraph. “And you can clearly see that on the video. But it is a suspension. I have to accept that, I have to take it. Obviously I feel sad because I’m not going to be able to help the team, to play. But I have accept it and respect it. “I’m not saying I’m an angel. I’m no angel. You can see that. But every time I play I will play the same way because that’s the way I am. That’s what I need to do in order to support my family. That’s my bread and butter. Also, that’s what I need to do for this club and for the fans of this club, for the supporters and for all the people involved in this club. “On the pitch I will always be like that. That’s my character and I will always compete and compete – always. I’m a different guy off the pitch, as you can see, but on the pitch I will not change. And I want to say this again: you can look at the video and interpret it however you want, but I know when I get home I can sleep in peace because I know I didn’t mean to do it.” Costa and Chelsea have no right to appeal, with the immediate ban meaning the forward missed Saturday evening’s 1-1 draw against Manchester City and will also sit out matches against Aston Villa and Everton. The former Atletico Madrid hitman believes the game has changed – not for the better – meaning less contact is allowed these days, but vowed not to change his style of play. “I’m always loyal, I always go 100 per cent, I always go on the limit but I think the people that think that I am a violent player, it’s because they interpret football a different way; they see it in a different way,” he said. “Back in the old days there used to be way more contact and a lot of things that were permitted. These days everyone is looking at it and I don’t think that is good for the game. “I have a go at defenders and they have a go at me. We argue. Whatever happens on the pitch stays on the pitch. After the game I shake hands with the defender. Job done, I go home, he goes home. We’re all mates. It’s all good. That’s how I see football. That’s how I play football. I’m not going to change it – football is a contact sport.” The 26-year-old was suspended for three games for violent conduct by the FA after an independent regulatory commission on Friday ruled he deliberately stamped on the ankle of the Liverpool midfielder in Tuesday’s Capital One Cup semi-final second leg. Costa says he accepts and respects the punishment, but stresses he did not set out to hurt his opponent. Press Associationcenter_img Chelsea striker Diego Costa insists there was no malicious intent behind the stamp on Emre Can which earned him a three-match ban from the Football Association. last_img read more