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first_img The Layover View Comments Related Shows Tony nominee Maria Dizzia will step into The Layover off-Broadway. She takes over for Annie Parisse in the role of Shellie beginning September 6. Parisse, who is leaving the show to film the Netflix comedy Friends from College, will play her final performance on September 4. The Leslye Headland drama opened officially at Second Stage’s Tony Kiser Theatre on August 25 and is scheduled to run through September 18.Dizzia received a Tony nomination in 2010 for her Broadway debut in In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). Her additional stage credits include Eurydice and Belleville off-Broadway. She has appeared on screen in the films While We’re Young, Martha Marcy May Marlene, Margin Call, Rachel Getting Married and True Story as well as Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black and more.The Layover follows Shellie and Dex, who meet on a delayed flight. Stuck in Chicago, the two get to know each other and have a romantic encounter that ultimately sends both of their lives into upheaval.The cast also features Adam Rothenberg, Quincy Dunn-Baker, Arica Himmel, John Procaccino and Amelia Workman.center_img Maria Dizzia(Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images) Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 18, 2016last_img read more

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first_imgYou’ve got to check out this awesome kayaking video from the Smith Optics: Great Days series. Todd and Brendan Wells take on some plunging waterfalls and snowmelt fed rapids that have to be seen to be believed.GREAT DAYS 10: Kayaking in the Pacific Northwest from smith optics on Vimeo.last_img

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first_img The executive director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), Michelle Bachelet, asked Uruguay to make an effort to increase the proportion of women on peace missions, following a meeting in Montevideo with President José Mujica. “We want there to continue to be many more ‘blue helmets,’ but also for there to be more female ‘blue helmets,’” Bachelet, who was visiting Uruguay in connection with a UN conference that analyzed how to improve multilateral development cooperation, said at a press conference. The former Chilean president (2006-2010) explained that “the experience that we’ve had in many countries in conflict is that the presence of women enables women, on the one hand, to dare to bring forward their problems, serious assaults on human rights and literal sexual assaults as well.” The presence of women on peace missions “has given strong impetus, in those countries that are in transition and developing their institutional structure, to the idea that women can be part of those Armed Forces or those police forces,” she indicated, adding that the UN is promoting this proposal in Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Uruguay – the tenth-ranking country in the number of troops it contributes to UN peace forces – is the nation that contributes the most personnel to the contingent in Haiti, around 900 Soldiers, in comparison to its total population, around 3.4 million inhabitants. On another topic, the director of UN Women defended the use of quotas to increase women’s participation in politics, “because it’s more democratic and more representative,” recalling that for women, “there are thousands of obstacles” to obtaining political office. “It’s a good thing, because democracy is not only electing people, but also having the possibility of being elected,” she maintained, emphasizing that women represent half the population. It’s true that women have won rights in many areas but their main goal lies in being mothers, homemaking, even though my way of thinking is conservative there is little or nothing to be done by men to change or stop female progress in different areas, I accept that they have the right through justice and through equal opportunities but I don’t like it, but I accept it. I am unable to understand the arguments, operational or administrative, if there are any, for increasing the number of women. I want to believe a lady whose function is of such international importance has other requests, which are also important. By Dialogo November 15, 2011last_img read more

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first_imgTrial Lawyer Section seminar spiced with international flavor Mark D. Killian Managing Editor While it has always been the mission of the Trial Lawyers Section to improve the trial advocacy skills of Florida lawyers, the section’s Advanced Trial Advocacy seminar is increasingly becoming an international affair. For years now the section has invited British barristers to attend its Advanced Trial Advocacy program at the University of Florida as faculty and students. This year the British contingent was joined by 10 South African advocates interested in honing their skills and learning how to replicate the program back in Cape Town. “It is possible that the reputation of The Florida Bar well exceeds what The Florida Bar thinks its reputation is,” said UF law professor Winston Negan, a native South African who assisted in bringing the Cape Town advocates to the program. Negan, who left South Africa in the 1960s, hopes the exchange will stimulate a lot more interaction between South African and Florida lawyers. “The Florida Bar is very progressive as far as its advocacy training is concerned, and we are looked to as a model for other nations,” said Kelly G. Hammer of Ocala, who co-chaired to program this year. Hammer said the seminar is designed as a hands-on, learning-by-doing, trial skills training intended for lawyers who have practiced for a minimum of five years and have a significant number of jury trials under their belts. “We realized that even though we have a high reputation in England for advocacy, we had not worked as hard as people here on the advocacy teaching skills,” said Tim Dutton, a Queens Counsel barrister who has participated in the program after first being exposed to it by the UF Professor Gerald Bennett, who died last year. “This program is fantastic,” Dutton said. “If you work hard at this course over the five days, you will mature by years as an advocate.” Based on what he learned in Florida, Dutton created a similar program at Keble College at Oxford, the first of its kind in England. And after Bennett passed away, the Trial Lawyers Section established a scholarship in honor of Bennett to allow a British barrister to attend the Advanced Trial Advocacy in Gaineville and the section’s British colleagues reciprocated with their own Bennett Scholarship for the Oxford Advanced Trial Program. The British Bennett Scholarship permits two American lawyers (a civil practitioner and a criminal practitioner) to attend the Oxford program. “The truth is, the essentials of good advocacy are the same the world over,” Dutton said. Dutton said because most U.S. civil trials are conducted in front of juries, the advocacy required is “to be clear, to the point, with no froth, no extras hanging around.” “Because we do most of our civil trials before judges and don’t have immediate feedback from judges, one danger that develops in that kind of civil practice is people become too wordy, too long-winded, and too convoluted and complex,” Dutton said. “It is quite good to put the two systems together because the benefit of one rubs off on the other.” South African Makhado Ramabulana said he is enjoying his interaction with the British and American lawyers and “there is a lot to pick up to hone your skills in presenting your case.” “This is the first time we have come here, and hopefully after this trial advocacy program we can set up a similar program in Cape Town,” said Jeff Lizani, a senior counsel in South Africa. “It is amazing how similar the basics are,” said UF Professor Jim Pierce, the faculty liaison to the section’s seminar, adding the participants had no trouble talking about each other’s legal structure. “If this program is a bit of a beginning of greater commercial and legal contacts with South Africa, it is just good for business for some Florida lawyers,” Pierce said. Negan said the South Africans were drawn to the program because “law is of high quality there; it is a very rule of law governed society.” “On one hand you have a constitution with many of the qualities like the U.S. Constitution, requiring vastly different skills of lawyers, and secondly the transformation from apartheid has put South Africa back into the international economy so their lawyers need to understand how the global economy works and how law works in the global economy and a lot of the cutting edge stuff is obviously in the United States,” Negan said. Negan also said the Florida participants learn as much from the foreign lawyers as they do from the Americans. “It gives our students and faculty a bit of a sense of the other legal cultures, where the differences are, where the emphases are and how much alike and similar things are in the terms of the skills of persuasion,” Negan said. “These kinds of programs begin to make lawyers more confident that they can function in a comparative and international and cross-cultural environment.” Pierce said legal systems have their own provincialisms about them and bringing together people from other countries undercuts that. “It causes us to think about basic axioms we have in regard to trial advocacy that are untested, untried, and we find that out there are other ways to do things,” Pierce said. “It helps knock off the provincial rough edges on the part of everybody.” Oxford’s Dutton said virtually all English civil cases are tried to a judge without a jury, the use of language in court takes on a greater importance. “Language is much more the weapon of the English advocate than here,” Dutton said. “For example, we can’t move around in court. We must stay behind the podium so your only weapon is your voice — the way you look at people and your mastery of law, obviously. Here, because people move around, you can use slide projection. . . that can dilute the linguistic skills.” Negan said in an increasingly globalized world, programs like the Trial Lawyers Section’s seminar help to create a better understanding between cultures. Trial Lawyer Section seminar spiced with international flavor June 1, 2001 Managing Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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first_imgCEO’s recipe for success: high energy, high engagement, and high expectationsEstablishing the CAP COM Cares Foundation changed everything: Consumers have a lot of financial services choices here in the capital region of New York. We feel very strongly that our credit union’s community efforts are a differentiator. In 2003, we organized our efforts toward education, wellness, and those residents who really needed help.As that took root, it was a turning point for our credit union. Community involvement gave us visibility, and connected us with “like” partners. It was a win-win. Our networking, visibility, and focus all improved.CAP COM went from being the best-kept secret to a household name. People started talking about us and liked what they saw. As a result, our greatest source of new members is referrals.Employee engagement starts on Day 1: I realized a long time ago that if we were to keep great people here, we had to be more than a paycheck—we had to touch their heart and soul. As the organization grew bigger, from nine employees when I started 35 years ago to nearly 300 today, we had to make sure every single person understood his or her role. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgGoogle stated it needed the information to prepare an effective defense. It offered to ensure that any confidential information would be made available solely to two in-house attorneys at the offices of Google’s outside counsel or in another secure manner, adding that it would promptly report any disclosure.The government said in a separate filing that allowing Google’s staff attorneys to review “strategic plans related to rival voice assistants, and other commercially sensitive information” was dangerous because they could misuse the information to squash potential competition.The government also said that highly confidential files in the last big technology antitrust case, which involved Microsoft about 20 years ago, were only available to the company’s outside counsel.- Advertisement – Alphabet’s Google and the US Justice Department have failed to reach agreement over a protective order for third parties like Microsoft that provided data to the government for its lawsuit against the search and advertising giant.Google is pressing for two in-house attorneys to have access to the confidential data while the Justice Department and state attorneys general involved in the lawsuit have disagreed, Google said in a court filing on Friday.- Advertisement – Which is the best TV under Rs. 25,000? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. The companies whose documents are in dispute in the Google case also include Oracle, AT&T, Amazon.com, Comcast, and others. They have until next Friday to make their proposals for the terms of a protective order.Judge Amit Mehta of the US District Court for the District of Columbia is hearing the Justice Department’s case against Google. The government sued Google in October, accusing the $1 trillion company of illegally using its market muscle to hobble rivals in the biggest challenge to the power and influence of Big Tech in decades.© Thomson Reuters 2020- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgIsrael’s internal security service Shin Bet has halted its cell-phone tracking of coronavirus carriers, an official said on Tuesday, citing the success of alternatives to the controversial method of containing contagions.Circumventing parliament in March as the coronavirus spread, the Israeli cabinet approved emergency regulations that enabled the use of the Shin Bet technology, usually deployed for anti-terrorism. Privacy watchdog groups have challenged the practice in court as lawmakers considered ratifying it.An Israeli official said the tracking was stopped following a ministerial meeting on the coronavirus on Monday at which Shin Bet director Nadav Argaman argued that the method was not required as infections taper off under other counter-measures. “This (tracking) will be renewed only if there is a big outbreak, at which point snap legislation would be required in parliament,” said the official, who requested anonymity.Israel – with a population of 9 million – has reported 18,091 coronavirus cases and 299 deaths. A limited resurgence prompted Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday to put the brakes on moves to reverse closures of schools and businesses.Topics :last_img read more

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first_imgSultan Al Jaber, Minister of the State and Chairman of Abu Dhabi Ports, and Capt. Mohamed Al Shamsi, CEO of AD Ports, visited Khalifa Port Extension Project on August 6th 2017.Eng. Yasser Zaghloul, CEO of NMDC, welcomed the delegation and after a brief introduction of the project site they placed a block for the new 1km long quay wall.The expansion at Khalifa Port will add 1,000 meters of quay wall to the port and deepen its main channel and basin to 18 meters from the current 16 meters. Moreover, the new quay wall will add 600,000 m² of cargo handling space.During the works, approximately 10.5 million cubic meters of material will be dredged from the Khalifa Port area.With over 250 workers involved in the expansion project, the Khalifa Port work is scheduled for completion in mid-2018.last_img read more

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first_imgSeacor Marine has acquired Brazilian offshore support vessels provider UP Offshore through a new joint venture company with Proyectos Globales de Energía y Servicios CME.UP Offshore has a fleet of 14 vessels, with 12 vessels located in Brazil and registered under the Brazilian flag. Four are designated as ROV support vessels.The equity of UP Offshore was acquired for nominal consideration and its debt was refinanced with approximately $95 million of new indebtedness.John Gellert, SEACOR Marine’s CEO, and Alfredo Miguel, president of CME and MEXMAR, in a joint statement, said: “We are pleased to expand our partnership and are excited to create a unique offshore services group with local presence in the major markets of Latin America. “During the past seven years, we have grown MEXMAR to a fleet of 15 vessels, all documented and registered in Mexico, and through our new joint venture, we will now have a meaningful presence in Brazil. In acquiring UP Offshore, we were able to use our joint venture capital efficiently and plan to integrate a strong platform in Latin America into SEACOR Marine’s global network. The UP Offshore transaction demonstrates the benefit of lenders and operators working together.”last_img read more

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first_imgNational Right to Life News 24 June 2015 Teen abortions in Minnesota have declined dramatically since the state enacted a law requiring parental notification before minors undergo abortions. Tomorrow is the 25th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding Minnesota’s parental notification requirement.The law (MN Statute 144.343), strongly supported by Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL), was passed by the Legislature with large bipartisan majorities in 1981. It requires that both parents be notified at least 48 hours before an abortion is performed on a minor girl. The measure includes a judicial bypass procedure, which is required by the courts, and exceptions for rare cases.Minnesota’s law was in place until 1986, when it was enjoined by a federal district court. The U.S. Supreme Court eventually ruled on June 25, 1990, in the case of Hodgson v. Minnesota, upholding both the two-parent and 48-hour requirements. The law went back into effect that year.“Our Minnesota law and the Supreme Court decision affirming it helped open the floodgates for more state parental involvement laws,” commented MCCL Executive Director Scott Fischbach. “Strong evidence shows that these laws in other states, among other factors, reduce the incidence of teen abortions.”The annual number of minor abortions in Minnesota peaked at 2,327 in 1980, the year before the parental notification law first went into effect. Teen abortions then began to steadily decline. Since 1989, the last full year before the Supreme Court ruling, abortions performed on minors have dropped 79 percent. In 2013 (the latest year for which data is available), minor abortions fell to 295, the lowest number on record (statistics for minors go back to 1975) and only 3 percent of all abortions.Despite broad public support for parental involvement laws, they are opposed by abortion advocacy groups. Planned Parenthood has fought against parents who want to be informed before an abortion is performed on their minor daughter at an unlicensed facility. Planned Parenthood has also fought against state oversight of abortion centers, which remain unlicensed and uninspected in Minnesota.http://www.nationalrighttolifenews.org/news/2015/06/parental-notification-law-reduces-teen-abortions-in-minnesota/#.VZH_HP4w-Umlast_img read more