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first_img Promoted ContentYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime17 Mind-Blowing Makeovers By Makeup Artist Vanessa Davis2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year8 Things To Expect If An Asteroid Hits Our PlanetTop 10 Iconic Personalities On TV Now7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayFascinating Ceilings From Different CountriesTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth? Manchester City’s appeal against a two-year ban from European competition opened before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Monday by videoconference, a court official told AFP. Manchester City’s appeal against a two-season ban from European football began on Monday City are accused of overstating sponsorship revenue to hide their failure to comply with UEFA’s financial fair-play (FFP) rules between 2012 and 2016. In addition to the ban, they were also fined 30 million euros ($34 million, £27 million). “The hearing has started well and the video conference is working well,” Matthieu Reeb, the secretary general of the Lausanne-based CAS, said. The remote hearing, which pits Manchester City against UEFA lawyers, opened 09:00 local time (0700 GMT) and is scheduled to last three days before closing on Wednesday evening.Advertisement Reeb said a decision could announced in July. Even if City’s appeal to CAS fails, the English champions could present a further appeal before the Swiss Federal Court, also based in Lausanne. UEFA’s case was prompted by a series of leaked emails published by German magazine Der Spiegel in 2018 that seemed to show how City manufactured extra sponsorship revenue from a series of companies with connections to the club’s Abu Dhabi-based owner Sheikh Mansour. Under the Sheikh’s ownership, City’s fortunes have been transformed, winning four Premier League titles in the past eight years. However, the billions invested in players and managers have not yet delivered the club’s first Champions League title.City are still involved in this season’s competition and will be allowed to compete should the 2019⁄20 edition of the Champions League return in August, no matter the outcome of the appeal.Another European powerhouse, Italian club AC Milan, has already been excluded from European competitions for failing to comply with the FFP rules, after losing their appeal to CAS in June 2019.A two-season ban from the competition would represent a huge blow to City’s prestige, finances and hope of keeping manager Pep Guardiola and key players like Kevin De Bruyne and Raheem Sterling.“Two years would be long. One year is something I might be able to cope with,” De Bruyne told Het Laatste Nieuws last month.City banked 93 million euros from prize money and television rights alone by reaching the quarter-finals of last season’s Champions League.The further loss of gate receipts and commercial revenue would make it extremely difficult for the club to meet FFP regulations without cutting costs.– Harder line –City have steadfastly rejected UEFA’s allegations.“Based on our experience and our perception, this seems to be less about justice and more about politics,” said CEO of the City Football Group Ferran Soriano.UEFA has been under pressure, most publicly from La Liga president Javier Tebas, to impose a harder line on clubs backed by states, such as City and Qatari-owned Paris Saint-Germain.European football’s governing body also have plenty riding on the case. If they lose the appeal, the FFP regulations would be undermined.A delayed outcome would leave a cloud hanging over the return of the Premier League season.City seem certain to secure Champions League qualification on the field with a 12-point lead over fifth-placed Manchester United.Read Also: Lionel Messi passed fit for La Liga restartIf they are excluded, fifth would be good enough for the riches of next season’s Champions League, which are all the more valuable during the economic crisis caused by coronavirus.Just six points separate United from Crystal Palace in 11th, leaving plenty to play for in the final nine rounds of matches of the season once the Premier League restarts on June 17.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Loading… Manchester City could struggle to keep manager Pep Guardiola and stars such as Kevin De Bruynelast_img read more

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first_img Berahino, who has burst on to the scene this season with six goals in nine matches for Albion, is to put pen to paper on a new contract “in the next 24 hours” according to head coach Steve Clarke. The 20-year-old striker, who grabbed the winner in a 2-1 victory over Manchester United at Old Trafford in September, has also bagged six goals in four games for England Under-21s. Despite there being a number of quality forwards in the West Brom squad, Clarke has no qualms Berahino will continue to make an impact. “Hopefully now he’s going to sign we can forget talking about contracts and talk about Saido the player, and keep trying to help him improve,” added Clarke. “And he shouldn’t be worried about where he is in the pecking order. “I think I have shown this season if it’s the right moment to put him on the pitch, I’ve done that, so he doesn’t have to worry about that. “He knows exactly where he is in the scheme of things here and how I use my squad. “When I turn to my bench and I’ve choices to make Saido has shown he can be the player I bring on to the pitch, or he can start games.” Rising West Brom star Saido Berahino is poised to commit his long-term future to the Baggies. After being constantly questioned about Berahino’s new deal over a number of months, Clarke showed signs of relief when asked again on Thursday whether the matter was almost done and dusted. Finally able to give a definitive answer, Clarke said: “I’m not very good at predictions, but I’m going to make another one – Saido will sign his contract in the next 24 hours.” Suggesting the deal would be a weight off Berahino’s mind, Clarke added: “It will be great for Saido because he is a young boy who has maybe become a little bit distracted by the fact it has been ongoing for so long. “I just feel there have been other things on his mind over the last couple of weeks. “When you get so close to signing what I have described before as a very, very, very good contract, as a young boy it can be difficult sometimes to get your head around that. “That’s been a little negative with regard to the situation, but there are not too many negatives surrounding Saido this season. “He has been a breath of fresh air in the squad, been a revelation. He’s made a big contribution to us already. “When he signs his contract he will have a massive part to play in the rest of the season for us.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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first_imgLiverpool manager Brendan Rodgers has sprung to the defence of Cardiff counterpart Malky Mackay, accusing the Welsh club’s owner Vincent Tan of “knowing nothing about football”. The Bluebirds visit Anfield on Saturday after a week in which there has been a public fall out between Mackay and Tan over transfers, leading to more speculation over the manager’s future. Their first season in the Barclays Premier League has seen further off-field strife with the sacking of head of recruitment Iain Moody, who was replaced by someone with no football background and a friend of Tan’s son. Rodgers finds it unbelievable that the situation has been allowed to develop as it has. “I find it incredible all the talk about Malky, who I know well from working with him at Watford,” said the former Swansea boss. “I find it astonishing what he has had to go through. This is a guy who walked into Cardiff after they had lost in the play-off semi-finals and they waited two weeks to sack the manager Dave Jones on the day we (Swansea) were in the final – which I found strange. “Malky walked into the club with 10 players that summer and he totally transformed the mentality of the club. “He took them to the Carling Cup final, to a play-off place and just lost out and the following season took them to the championship and promotion. “He has had great results this season and is going to go on and be a great manager at a big club and I find it absolutely astonishing there is talk about him leaving there. “I worked with Iain Moody at Watford, one of the most authentic people you could ever meet. “My only conclusion is you have a business guy operating the club who knows absolutely nothing about football. Press Association “He has obviously been a successful businessman – congratulations but football is like no other business. “When I see what Malky has had to put up with, to see him being questioned I find it remarkable. “Especially when supporters there look up to him and respect him for what he’s done.” Liverpool also found themselves with owners who knew nothing about football when Fenway Sports Group took over in October 2010. However, Rodgers said the Americans have spent time learning the ropes in terms of owning and running the club and were prepared to be patient. “They have a strategy,” he said. “When I look at decisions being made about managers this week it makes me really appreciate the decision to come here. “The owners have been so supportive of me but ultimately they had a strategy, a vision in terms of how they wanted to work. “They brought someone in and trusted them to give them that time to implement it. “We have some way to go in order to be where I want us to be but it is clear we are making progress and you have to give the owners clear credit for that. “Never once have I felt under any pressure. If they are putting you under extreme pressure in a short period of time it may affect decision-making. “Even in the most difficult moments in the first six months here, when we didn’t have a lot of coaching time with the players, they were strong and committed in terms of the choice they made. “Hopefully over the longer term they will get rewards for that because they have shown strategically they know where they want the club to go and they are prepared to give it the time to evolve.” last_img read more

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first_img Press Association Manchester City boss Manuel Pellegrini believes in-form striker Alvaro Negredo has proved a perfect addition to the squad. Negredo took his goal tally for the season to 18 with a brilliant hat-trick in City’s 6-0 rout of West Ham in the first leg of their Capital One Cup semi-final on Wednesday. The Spaniard, signed last summer from Sevilla for £20million, has also formed effective partnerships with first Sergio Aguero and now – in the injury-enforced absence of the Argentinian – Edin Dzeko. He also showed against West Ham how hard-working he is all round the field, notably when he chased back to his own area – when City were leading 3-0 – to win a tackle. Pellegrini said: “On more than one occasion he ran back to win the ball. “He recovered balls, he scored three goals, he was the link with the midfielders – it was a complete game. “I always thought he was the player this team needed. I knew him very well from the nine years I was in Spain, so when he arrived here I was absolutely sure he was the striker we needed.” Dzeko also struck twice against the Hammers at the Etihad Stadium and Pellegrini was pleased with how the pair combined. The former Malaga coach said: “Both of them played very well – and also the midfielders (David) Silva, (Yaya) Toure and (Samir) Nasri did well. “That’s why when we made a squad at the beginning of the season, we brought in important players. “You normally have a lot of injuries during the season, and Alvaro and Dzeko have replaced Aguero and (Stevan) Jovetic, who is another important player who can’t play at the moment. “It is important for the team that we don’t depend on just one name.” Negredo believes he is probably enjoying the best spell of his career, although he still thinks he can improve. The 28-year-old said: “My feelings and my game make me think this could be the best moment, we just have to wait (on that), but I’m feeling comfortable. “I score a lot of goals and hopefully I can make some assists. “Hopefully I can continue like this for the rest of my career. “The only goal is to grow, to improve as a player and become better.” Negredo’s value has undoubtedly increased during his short time with high-flying City. Just 12 months ago he was being linked with a £13million switch to Everton but he feels he moved to England at the right time. He said: “There were some rumours but I just wanted to finish the season with Seville. “I wanted to wait until it got to the summer before I started looking at other options. “I never really considered the possibility of moving in January.” last_img read more

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first_img Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all) Bio Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016 Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013.center_img Ellsworth junior Bryce Harmon goes for a contested layup in the Eagles’ 63-47 loss to Lake Region in the Class B state championship Friday night in Bangor. PHOTO BY TIM SUELLENTROPBANGOR – The Lake Region boys’ basketball team used speed and pressure to defeat Ellsworth 63-47 in Friday night’s Class B state championship at the Cross Insurance Center.The Lake Region Lakers outscored the Ellsworth Eagles 18-5 in the third quarter en route to their first state title in 31 years.“They were much quicker than we were,” Ellsworth coach Peter Austin said of Lake Region. “That’s a good team.”Ellsworth would remain in the game until the second half.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textBoth squads came out hot in the opening quarter. Ellsworth senior Nicholas Bagley scored the first points just 15 seconds into the game with a 3-pointer. Nick Wandishin answered with four points for Lake Region.Ellsworth senior Bruce St. Peter put the Eagles back on top with a field goal, and sophomore Zach Harris added to it with a fast break layup on a steal.Nate Smith hit a 3-pointer for Lake Region to tie the score 7-7.The Eagles would take back the lead three more times over the next three minutes. Junior Bryce Harmon pulled Ellsworth back ahead with a basket, and Lake Region’s Jackson Lesure matched it. St. Peter hit a field goal and a free throw and, 12 seconds later, so did Smith to tie the score again 12-12.“We got our shots that we needed, and we got in the right spots and set some good screens,” Austin said Ellsworth’s performance early in the game.St. Peter hit one more foul shot to give the Eagles their final lead with two minutes and 30 second left in the first quarter. From there, Lake Region outscored Ellsworth 7-1 to enter the second period up 19-14.The Eagles stuck with the Lakers for the rest of the half. Bruce St. Peter scored five of Ellsworth’s 10 second-quarter points to cut Lake Region’s lead to 28-24 at halftime.But Lake Region opened the third quarter with a 16-point run.“Lake Region’s defense turned it up a notch,” Austin said. “We just couldn’t get going, and we couldn’t hit a shot either.”Bagley ended Ellsworth’s scoring drought with a field goal-and-one with three minutes left in the third period. Senior Kyle Golding would score Ellsworth’s only other basket that quarter.Down 46-29, Zach Harris opened the final period with a 3-pointer. He followed it with a field goal on the Eagles’ next possession, but they would never get back within striking distance.“The lead was just insurmountable at that time,” Austin said. “And we were tired puppies because of them. They got up and down the floor.”Still, Ellsworth would put up 18 points in the fourth quarter. St. Peter and Golding contributed four and three of those points while Bagley and senior Charles Libby also each hit a 3-pointer.St. Peter led Ellsworth with a game-high 15 points. Bagley, Golding and Harris contributed nine, eight and seven.Smith and Lesure each scored 14 points for the Lakers.Lake Region outrebounded Ellsworth 36-25. Austin said the Lakers’ pressure also affected the Eagles, who made just 16 of their 50 shots.“I knew the pressure was going to be there,” Austin said. “We were just always on our heels the whole game.”The Eagles’ 10-game winning streak came to an end, but not before they notched their first regional title in 28 years.“The outcome didn’t come out the way we wanted, but the community support has been great,” Austin said. “It was a great ride. We just came up against a better team tonight.”View more photos from the game here.The Ellsworth boys’ basketball team poses with its regional championship and state runner-up plaques after its 63-47 loss to Lake Region in the Class B state championship Friday night in Bangor. PHOTO BY TIM SUELLENTROP Latest Posts Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016last_img read more

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first_imgUW quarterback John Stocco shined in his 2006 home debut against Western Illinois, completing 15 of 25 passes for 227 yards and a touchdown.Stocco left the game with a bang, hitting his tight end Andy Crooks with a short pass as he was hit hard by the Leathernecks’ blitz. Crooks promptly rumbled up the middle for a 24-yard touchdown, putting the Badgers up 34-3 and bringing the Camp Randall crowd to its feet.However, the only one not standing and cheering was Stocco, who got up gingerly and left under his own power with UW trainers by his side.Here’s the good news: Stocco is fine.”I just got my head shook up a little bit, I got hit in the jaw, I think, but I feel all right now,” Stocco added.However, since Crooks’ touchdown effectively put the game out of reach for UW, Stocco — along with Joe Thomas, Kraig Urbik and other first-stringers — sat the rest of the game. Tyler Donovan took over the reins for the last 10 minutes, and — putting things lightly — didn’t impress.Donovan threw three passes, and only one of them was completed … to Leathernecks cornerback Kevin Almlie, who brought back the interception 17 yards for WIU’s only touchdown of the game. Donovan also was sacked twice and was called for two delay-of-game penalties, although Bielema blamed the coaching staff for the latter of those miscues.”The part that we’ve really got to clean up [is] just the mechanics of how the clock is going to be started on the change of possession,” Bielema said, referring to the NCAA’s new rules in 2006 concerning the play clock. “There’s a little bit of inconsistency as far as when that thing is actually starting to roll and the communication to us [as coaches].”We’ve just got to get a better feel for that and understand it, because we can’t have that happen in Big Ten play.”In the end, despite Donovan’s alleged progress in fall camp with UW’s first team, the fourth-quarter fiasco could make Badger players, coaches and fans very nervous in thinking about what could happen to Wisconsin’s season should Stocco go down.”Obviously, we didn’t execute the way that we needed to out there,” Bielema said. “It’s been a difficult road, I think, for Tyler … maybe he wasn’t as sharp in his preparation as he would be looking back on it.”It wasn’t just Donovan, however, who played poorly in the final minutes of the game. The two delay-of-game calls were accompanied by a medley of other bad penalties, including two flags for an ineligible receiver downfield and another for 12 men on the field.”[There’s] a lot of things they can clean up,” Stocco said afterward, speaking of the second unit. “A lot of it, we can’t have those mistakes, those delay of games, and all that stuff that happened. That wasn’t just Tyler, that’s the coaches too and other guys out there, that’s something that we all have to clean up.”The more reps [Donovan] gets, the better he’s going to get.”Moreover, without Thomas and Urbik anchoring the line, true freshman Lance Smith ran the ball three times for no gain and added a late carry for just one yard.All told, with penalty yards included, the Badgers ran nine plays in the final 10 minutes for — get ready for this — a loss of 28 yards.”One thing that I’m not afraid to do as a coach, I love to challenge people,” Bielema said. “The one thing [we] need to do is [we] need to respond, and I really expect our team to respond this week.”How, Bielema was asked, would he challenge Donovan after Saturday’s debacle?”Not repeat today’s performance,” Bielema replied with a wry grin.last_img read more

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first_imgEAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Jay Bromley didn’t have to look far to find defensive linemen to look up to.As the developing defensive lineman grew up in the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, New York, the New York Giants consistently had some of the best pass-rushers in the NFL. His personal favorite was defensive end Osi Umenyiora.“I loved the D-line of that whole team,” Bromley said. “The inside guys, outside guys, the pressure they put on the quarterback. They just caused havoc.“Defensive linemen have been the root and the foundation of this defense for years.”But after finishing in the NFL’s Top 10 in team sacks 11 times in the last 20 years, the Giants’ ability to terrorize opposing quarterbacks hasn’t been the same. With the 10th pick in the third round of the 2014 NFL Draft, the Giants made an investment for their future with Bromley. They also added to the Syracuse culture — rejoining Bromley with Ryan Nassib and Justin Pugh — within the franchise in hopes he’ll help the team’s defensive line rediscover its glory days.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I believe I can be a presence to help stop the run and I believe hopefully I’ll get an opportunity to show what I can do on third down,” Bromley said during Giants training camp in July. “But everything comes with time. I’m not in a rush to make anything crazy happen.“I just want to be patient, learn each and every day and continue to get better.”When Bromley lines up opposite the Giants’ offensive linemen at practice, the rookie defensive tackle can look to his left and find Pugh’s familiar face.But the fights he and Pugh used to pick with each other — and sometimes get kicked off the practice field at Syracuse for — are in the past.“Luckily we’re not out on the streets, you can get arrested out there for doing that stuff,” said Pugh, a second-year right tackle with the Giants. “Me and Bromley got into it a few times at Syracuse but he’s my boy, so when you get upfield you give him a high-five and all’s good.”Nassib doesn’t go up against Bromley as much as Pugh might, but has welcomed him to the Giants’ organization just as warmly.“Great kid. I loved him when we were at Syracuse and I’m going to love him now,” said Nassib, the Giants’ backup quarterback and the all-time passing yards leader at Syracuse. “He knows that if he ever needs anything, any advice or whatever, that Justin and I are always here for him.“He plays with a lot of heart, a lot of aggression and I’m excited for him.”When the Giants knocked off the New England Patriots in both Super Bowl XLII and XLVI, they recorded more sacks than any other teams in each of the respective postseasons.From the easternmost borough of New York City, Bromley studied those linemen — and still hasn’t stopped studying pass rushers across the country.“I love watching the D-linemen play and just try to imitate the greats,” Bromley said. “That’s the way I look at it. You can always take little things and try to sprinkle it in your game.”But now, for the Giants, the days of Umenyiora’s productivity are long gone and the era of Hall of Famer Michael Strahan — who ranks fifth in NFL history in sacks — is even more distant.For the first time in 18 years, the Giants have gone back-to-back seasons placing outside of the top 20 in the NFL in team sacks.Jason Pierre-Paul was once one of the most feared young defensive ends in the league, but is coming off two unproductive, incomplete seasons. He’s now expected to be the anchor of the Giants’ front four, since defensive end Justin Tuck bolted to the Oakland Raiders as a free agent.“We’ve got a lot of work to do,” Pierre-Paul said at training camp in July. “The rookies we have here, I told straight up: Just do what you can to help us out but at the same time, learn the system.”The Giants’ base defense is a 4-3 and the defensive tackles often line up in the three-technique, across from the B-gap between the offensive guard and tackle. SU ran a 4-3 and Bromley mostly played three-technique with the Orange, and those familiarities could work to his advantage as he adjusts to the NFL.Though his hand skills and lower-body strength were adequate for taking on blocks and shedding them, Bromley said, his ability to keep his shoulder pads low needed work during training camp.At 6 feet, 3 inches, he said, it’s not easy to stay low to the ground.“He really needs to work on a lot of technique and needs every rep he can get,” Giants defensive line coach Robert Nunn said in July. “Great attitude, good personality, fits in the room and he’s off to a good start, but he needs time. But I like where he is as far as his eagerness.“He’s done an outstanding job picking up the defense. Really exciting prospect.”Bromley, listed at 306 pounds, has added about 20 pounds since last year, but said he’s still at a comfortable size for mobility.He’s noticed that offensive linemen at the professional level are bigger and still just as quick as he is, and much sharper technique is needed to beat them.After being deactivated for the Giants’ season opener, Bromley received his first NFL action at home against the Arizona Cardinals on Sept. 14 and recorded his first NFL tackle.He’s low on the Giants’ depth chart now and it may be a while before he sees meaningful snaps.Bromley has a long way to go to become the Giants’ next great pass rusher, but playing his home games in a stadium 40 minutes from where he grew up is a good start.“It means everything, man,” Bromley said. “I was blessed enough to be drafted home and have the opportunity to play here. I just want to make the most of it.” Comments Published on September 23, 2014 at 12:10 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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first_imgJust after 3 p.m. on a Friday in September, a line of students stretched across three storefronts in Marshall Square Mall.Some gripped Starbucks iced coffees. Others used their shirt sleeves to fight the humidity. All of them craned their necks to see how close they stood to the next head coach of the Syracuse men’s basketball team.One by one, they walked up to Mike Hopkins as he offered a swinging high-five, an autographed photo and a personalized conversation.Smack. “Were you at the six-overtime game or do you just have the shirt?”Smack. “Where’d you get those shoes? Those are sweet.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSmack. “How’s your freshman year going? You came a long way from Atlanta.”A freshman boy was worried about the weather. “Is it really that bad?” he asked.Hopkins’ eyes widened as he jumped into his own coming-to-Syracuse story. In 1988, he moved to central New York from sunny Mission Viejo, California to play basketball for the Orange. He had a full head of surfer-blonde hair, an unrelenting work ethic and was in pursuit of perfection. That’s how he went from JV athlete to Big East recruit. From benchwarmer to Syracuse captain. From Syracuse’s temporary head coach to the man who will take over for Jim Boeheim in 2018.“Mike has truly earned this honor through his hard work, dedication and commitment to our program for more than 20 years,” Boeheim said when Hopkins was announced as his successor. “There is no one more ready or prepared to carry on the success of Syracuse basketball than Mike Hopkins.”The transition started Saturday, and Hopkins’ voice quivered with emotion as he lamented not winning for his mentor. He was filling in for Boeheim for the first of his nine-game suspension stemming from an NCAA investigation. Twenty minutes after Syracuse fell to Georgetown, he stopped midsentence and took a long stare at the box score in front of him. When he looked up at a room crammed with reporters, his eyes were red and filling with tears.I’ve been preparing myself to be a head coach for 20 years. That was always what I wanted to be. I always visualized myself doing it.Mike HopkinsHopkins doesn’t dwell on how long it took to get here; instead he remembers everyone who said he’d fail. He keeps three binders marked “Inspirational Quotes” in his office. He recently read a book titled “Onward: How Starbucks Fought For Its Life Without Losing Its Soul” to study a company’s success. He became Syracuse’s next head basketball coach by turning every experience into a learning opportunity, by turning every day into a step toward that dream.In some ways, it all began with the purchase of an oversized coat when he got to Syracuse some 27 years prior. Hopkins reached out his arms to show the freshman from Atlanta just how puffy it was. Time, he explained, has acquainted him with the cold. Time has done a lot of things.“Now it’s shoes, no socks, jeans and a light jacket,” Hopkins said to him. “When you’re here this long, you just adjust. You’ll be fine my man. See you at the games.”,• • •It was 7 a.m. on a Saturday and, like any kid, Mike Hopkins was fast asleep.But Griffin Hopkins, his father, had been awake for several hours. He started with a five-mile run, tidied up the house and was now washing the family cars while their California neighborhood stirred in the morning hush.“I can’t believe your dad is out there and you’re going to lay in bed,” Mike’s mother, Sue, said through his bedroom door. So he peeled away the blanket, put two feet on the floor and followed his father’s lead.Five days a week, Griffin woke up at 4:30 a.m. to drive 65 miles through Los Angeles traffic to his family-built business in La Verne, California. Then he’d drive 65 miles back, all so his family could live in the idyllic Orange County. He’d sometimes fall asleep at the dinner table but always helped his wife with the dishes at night’s end.“He was just like a machine,” Mike said. “That’s where I learned it.”Griffin signed Mike up for his first organized basketball team in the fourth grade, and Mike took to the game immediately with an unyielding tenacity. The skill it took to score, grit to defend, teamwork to win. He was the first player on his team to develop an actual jump shot because he realized other kids couldn’t block it.By sixth grade, Mike was playing on an AAU team with two future NBA players, a college All-American and a gold medal Olympic sprinter. He played one-on-one with his friend Chris Patton — then rated the No. 1 high school freshman in the country — and would lose 50-1 in Patton’s backyard. They’d play again to the same result. And again, same result.“I fell in love with basketball because my friends were all better than me,” Mike said. “And then it was, ‘How do I get better?’”He arrived at Mater Dei (California) High School as a solid player dead set on becoming more. He played on the freshman team but stayed in the gym to watch the JV and varsity practice, studying players both good and bad. He refused to leave the gym until he won the last game of one-on-one. Late at night, he’d call one of the assistant coaches to discuss everything from his help defense to free-throw form.And if he wasn’t shooting hoops, Mike glued himself to Big East games playing in primetime on the opposite coast. Patrick Ewing at Georgetown. Chris Mullin at St. John’s. Pearl Washington at Syracuse. He watched with friends and rattled off their names like he was opening a pack of baseball cards.Mater Dei head coach Gary McKnight took Mike and a few friends to a Syracuse basketball camp after their freshman season. Though it wasn’t a recruiting trip, Mike treated it like one. And he fell in love.“He came back and he told everybody that I’m going to go to Syracuse. He said, ‘I’m going to get a basketball scholarship,’” Paul Hoover, then a Mater Dei assistant coach, said. “And everybody laughed at him. I can remember people saying, ‘Yeah, sure you are Mike. Sure.’”Three years later, Syracuse unveiled a strong recruiting class that featured Billy Owens, Dave Johnson, Richard Manning and a lanky kid from southern California. Mike, who stood 6 feet, 5 inches tall, had impressed Boeheim enough to earn a scholarship, but didn’t exactly figure into the Orange’s future plans.,He redshirted his first season, played sparingly the next and was just about done with Syracuse after logging 13 minutes per game as a sophomore. After the Orange lost to Richmond in the first round of the 1991 NCAA Tournament, Mike told Matt Roe what he’d been thinking all year.“I don’t know if I’m ever going to play here; I think I have to leave,” Roe, who’d transferred from SU to Maryland two years prior, remembers Mike saying.“And for a second,” Roe says now, “I thought he really meant it.”With the season over, Mike took a trip home during a break from school. His father’s company had just opened a new plant and he wanted to give his son a tour. They had talked about transferring several times — over the phone, in the house, in the car — but now Griffin showed Mike the tangible reward of hard work.When they got to PaperPak Product’s new offices, a security guard asked to see Griffin’s ID. He patted both his pockets and realized he’d left it in the car.“Listen, my name is Griffin Hopkins and I work here,” he said to the security guard.But the guard wouldn’t let them through without identification. They walked back through the plant, got his wallet from the car and approached the entrance.“Mr. Hopkins I apologize … ” the guard started, realizing that he had been talking to the CEO.“This is the type of person I want working for me,” Griffin responded. “You’re just doing your job at a high level and I’ll always remember that.”Standing beside his father, Mike knew the key to getting on the court at Syracuse.• • •The church was quiet aside from the bouncing of the basketball.Hopkins often went there with Leo Rautins, who played at SU in the early ‘80s before embarking on a professional career. Rautins later moved back to Syracuse, took a liking to the 20-year-old Hopkins and found himself with a key to Most Holy Rosary Parish on the city’s west side. So they came to the gym and took free throws, then jumpers, then broke into an all-out game of one-on-one.Now the church was filled with voices, two of them, trash-talking each other while elbows flew and sweat dripped on the worn wooden floor.“I used to talk a lot of (stuff) to him, try and get in his head, try and control him, try and do things like that,” Rautins said. “It was an effort to teach him how to do it.”In Hopkins’ third active season, he teamed with Adrian Autry in Syracuse’s backcourt and used wit and will to become the team’s eccentric energy source. He regularly dove on the floor, pressed up on the opposition’s best players and was named a captain as a senior.Away from practices and games, Hopkins itched for more and went to the church with Rautins. He and teammate Stevie Thompson knew what buttons to press in the Manley Field House security room to get in late at night. If they couldn’t, they ran down to the Women’s Building and played on a wooden backboard with an old-school rim.He knew the late-shift security guard in the Carrier Dome, who would flick on the hallway lights to illuminate a path to the court.Inside a dark, empty stadium, Hopkins took jump shots alone.“Mike was a different breed,” said Autry, who now works alongside Hopkins as an SU assistant coach. “He just wanted it so badly. He didn’t stop and he figured it out. Having a guy like that, it gave us a certain edge, a swagger. We knew, within the program, how much Mike meant to our team.”,After leaving Syracuse, his life was filled with injuries, plane rides and a fleeting goal of playing professional basketball.It started in Denver, where he recalled being one of the last cuts off the Nuggets’ summer league team. Then he was days away from flying to Cyprus for what he said was a $35,000 contract before a last-minute change. Instead he trekked to Rochester, Minnesota, for a brief stint in the Continental Basketball Association.Next was an international tour that included stops in Turkey, France and Holland. Eventually he decided to hang it up.Back in Orange County, Hopkins thought about his next step. Two and a half years had passed, and he needed a direction. He wanted to work for his father, but Griffin had just laid off six employees after coming off a bad financial year. He didn’t think it would be right to hire his son in their place, so Hopkins sunk into his couch, bag of Doritos in hand, and watched hours of O.J. Simpson coverage to pass the time.Knowing that your career is over is depressing enough, and now my dad can’t hire me so now it’s like the double depression shot of espresso at Starbucks. The double shot of misery.Mike HopkinsNaturally, he turned to basketball. Hopkins called an old coach and started giving personal lessons. Soon he had a dozen players and was coaching an AAU team. He thought he may be onto something. Then the phone rang.“Listen, I think I’m going to get the Duke job. I think you’d be a great coach,” said Tim O’Toole, an assistant at Syracuse. “You should call Coach Boeheim and tell him you’d want my spot if I get the job.”O’Toole was right about two things: He was hired as a Duke assistant, and Hopkins had a knack for teaching. Hopkins called Boeheim and, like he did eight years prior, flew out to Syracuse to help his former coach with a camp.He hasn’t left central New York since.“Every star was aligned,” Hopkins said. “The way it happened was incredible.”• • •Gerry McNamara stretched out his arms and legs, picked up a basketball and started walking toward the basket on the far side of Syracuse’s practice court.He’d worked out with Hopkins, an assistant coach then in charge of the guards, from the start of his career in 2002, and here he was again in an empty gym.As he crossed half court, the junior guard noticed two pieces of tape stuck to the floor. The first one, about 8 feet behind the 3-point line, read “J.J.’S RANGE.” The second, 4 feet in front, read “G-MAC’s RANGE.”Hopkins wanted to remind McNamara of Duke’s J.J. Redick, who was making national headlines and averaging 21.8 points per game. McNamara smiled, shook his head and started launching 3s.“I couldn’t wait until he got out there because I was going to give him quite a face full of stuff,” McNamara said. “He had a way of getting under your skin in the perfect way.”From the time he started as an assistant in 1996, Hopkins’ creativity and non-stop energy made him a skilled motivator.When Ryan Blackwell was slumping in 1998, he called the sophomore into his office and showed him a highlight tape of his best plays that Hopkins compiled himself. He offered to come early and stay late for any player, to help them “figure it out” like he had, in the darkness of the Carrier Dome so many years ago.Allen Griffin took him up on that, dozens of times, and Hopkins dove after his misses so they wouldn’t hit the floor. When Griffin’s girlfriend gave birth in December of 1998, Hopkins sat patiently in the Crouse Hospital waiting room.For him to be there for me the way he was, all the time, it’s something I will cherish for the rest of my life.Allen GriffinHopkins began as a restricted-earnings assistant who wasn’t allowed to recruit. That afforded him opportunities to get close with the players and immerse himself in opponent scouting. When he started on the recruiting trail around 2000, he drove with his pregnant wife up and down Interstate 81 to seek talent in SU’s backyard.Working with fellow assistant Troy Weaver, Hopkins’ first class included Craig Forth, Billy Edelin, Josh Pace and Hakim Warrick. The next featured Gerry McNamara and Carmelo Anthony. In the spring of 2003, those six players formed the nucleus of Syracuse’s only national championship team.“Hop is a guy who can take a kid, whether it’s a kid at the end of the bench or a kid who plays a lot, and he’ll make them feel special,” said Jim Hart, who coached Forth in AAU. “As a coach, you want to send your kids to play for a guy like that. He was so trustworthy as a recruiter.”His eye for talent and ability to develop it made him a hot coaching candidate in the coming years. He was connected to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte job in 2010, Oregon State in 2014 and a handful of other opportunities. He says he interviewed for some, declined others and always had the same rebuttal when schools talked badly of the Syracuse weather.“It’s always warm in the Carrier Dome,” he’d tell them.In 2013, Hopkins said he was nearly hired at USC before the Trojans chose Florida Gulf Coast’s Andy Enfield. He was disappointed he wouldn’t get closer to home, but Syracuse was where every opportunity had originated. Boeheim hired him without any experience, took him to work with the U.S. Olympic team and had already said he wanted Hopkins to take over for him when he retired, whenever that would be.“Life is unpredictable, you never know what’s going to happen,” Hopkins said. “Live for the day, try and prepare the best for the day.”He was officially named the Orange’s “head-coach-in-waiting” in June.,• • •In October, Hopkins placed his MacBook Pro on his office desk.He flipped it open and pulled up 15 years of photos and videos organized by date. His eyes lit up. Memories flooded back.“I need to look at this all more often,” he said to himself. “Man, look at this stuff.”There was his son Griffin’s first time at Yankee Stadium. A video of him working on Demetris Nichols’ jump shot. A photo of his dad and brother smiling in the Carrier Dome stands. A shot of him and Derrick Rose, arm in arm at USA Basketball camp, after he and a handful of NBA stars got McDonald’s after a late-night workout.Next there will be photos from Saturday’s game. Then from his first season as a head coach. And then … who knows.He scrolls through the years and starts connecting the dots. From childhood to perfectionist, from player to coach, from failure to success. This is how he got here. This is how he became the next head coach of a program that was once 2,700 miles from home and even farther from reality.It’s all right there on the 15-inch screen, proof of what the world has already seen.“When I first started coaching, my goal wasn’t to be the head coach at Syracuse,” Hopkins said. “My goal was to be the best coach on the planet. I just wanted to be the best.”,Banner photo by Sam Maller | Staff Photographer Comments bpaine888 December 11, 2015 at 2:29 pm Lisa Dougherty December 7, 2015 at 9:06 am Jim December 8, 2015 at 10:02 am Great read!center_img What a fabulous profile!! That’s exceptional journalism. Makes me proud to be a DO alum. Published on December 6, 2015 at 11:31 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. last_img read more

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first_img Published on September 15, 2017 at 10:58 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+ Hendrik Hilpert was the last Syracuse player on the pitch. The SU goalkeeper fielded questions about his team’s second consecutive loss to Louisville, the team Hilpert “thought about all summer.” Meanwhile, UofL players sang in the visiting locker room to the tune of “Hey! baby” by Bruce Channel.“Today I failed as well,” Hilpert said. “They scored one more goal than us and I didn’t make the difference.”The first road team to win at SU Soccer Stadium since October 2015 continued singing on its way to the bus following its 2-1 victory over Syracuse. Hilpert made five saves on the night, one short of his career high, but Syracuse struggled to create chances. When it did, it faltered. For the 10th time since 2008, No. 7 Syracuse (4-1-2, 0-1-1 Atlantic Coast) failed to beat No. 17 Louisville (4-1-1, 1-1-0). “This is one of our benchmarks that we set,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “They are one of the premier programs not just in our conference but in the country. Look we’ve come close, I thought we had our moments … unfortunately we let the opportunity slip.”Since joining the conference in 2013, McIntyre has led SU to victories over every ACC team except Louisville. For a moment on Friday, it looked like the narrative would finally change in front of a crowd of 2,006, the eighth-largest total in program history.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBilly Tanner | Contributing PhotographerTen minutes into the match, sophomore defender John-Austin Ricks worked a give and go on the right sideline with Jonathan Hagman. Ricks gave the ball the back to the middle before darting down the field. When he received the next pass, he was met by a Louisville defender who knocked the ball out of bounds, granting Syracuse a corner kick. On the restart, Hugo Delhommelle sent the ball near post to a leaping Ricks, who flicked the ball to the back netting before being swallowed by a swarm of orange jerseys.Ricks’ shot Syracuse’s last for the next 28 minutes. While the Orange offense stalled, Louisville scored once and tallied eight shots. The Cardinals outshot SU 11 to three in the frame. “It’s just been two tough games. Two frustrating games,” said sophomore midfielder Mo Adams, who has lost in both career matches against Louisville. “(It) breaks my heart once again walking off that field.”With the game tied at one, Ricks launched a through ball to Tajon Buchanan who had a step on his defender. As Buchanan charged toward the ball, the Louisville defender grabbed a hold of him. The play resulted in a yellow card for Louisville and free kick for Delhommelle just a few yards outside the penalty area.The crowd pounded its feet on the bleachers as Delhommelle set up for the Orange’s best scoring chance in over 30 minutes. He shot short side at the right post and Louisville’s goalkeeper deflected the ball leaving a rebound for Johannes Pieles. The Syracuse forward struck the ball on one touch, wide right. Two minutes later Mohamed Thiaw scored on Louisville’s 11th shot of the half.“Ultimately we didn’t create, we didn’t test their goalkeeper enough,” McIntyre said.Mike Cossaboom | Contributing PhotographerSyracuse held Louisville to just one shot in the second half while tallying only two of its own. SU’s five shots was its lowest mark of the year, under half of its per game average of just over 10.The Orange struggled to find room in the middle. Louisville utilized a 4-3-2-1 formation for much of the match. With a formation shaped like a Christmas tree, with a strong base while thin at the top, Louisville forced Syracuse to the outside. Late in the second half, Jonathan Hagman inserted a corner kick from the outside. Louisville goalkeeper Jake Gelnovatch bobbled the ball. Petter Stangeland spun around, attempting an off-balance shot only to meet the hands of Gelnovatch. “We just need that final quality cross and touch to be able to put it away,” McIntyre said. McIntyre’s team never found it though. Syracuse’s last scoring chance came with just under 30 seconds remaining in the game Hilpert sent a restart from midfield into the Louisville penalty area. The Cardinals defense swarmed Pieles before he could fully field it. The ensuing throw-in for Syracuse was denied as well.When the final whistle blew Hilpert fell motionless to the grass. For Syracuse, it was another loss to Louisville.“In the end it’s always about one percent,” Hilpert said. “Louisville had this percent and we didn’t.” Commentslast_img read more